Overview of OSHA and OSHA Regulations

What is OSHA?

What is OSHA?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a national public health agency that is part of the United States Department of Labor. OSHA was established under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which was signed into law on December 29, 1970.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act law, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthy workplace conditions for all employees, and OSHA’s purpose is to set and enforce safety standards and to provide training and assistance to ensure that this responsibility to the worker is met.

As a part of the United States Department of Labor, OSHA is headed by the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, who is a direct subordinate of the Secretary of Labor, a member of the cabinet of the President of the United States.

What are OSHA safety standards?

OSHA safety standards are regulations that are aimed to improve the safety and well-being of workers. These standards are set for specific industries and discuss safety training, use of equipment, signage, and more. Learn more...

Who can be inspected by OSHA?

Almost every business in the United States is eligible to be inspected by OSHA for compliance with safety regulations. Learn more...

What do I need to pass an OSHA inspection?

There are many elements of a safe workplace that factor into passing an OSHA inspection. Dependent on your industry, the posting of official safety signs, use of protective equipment, and proper training could help in successfully passing an inspection. Learn more...

What happens during an OSHA inspection?

During an OSHA, inspectors will review previous records, inspect potential on-site hazards, and interview employees. OSHA’s inspections are prioritized by how potentially hazardous a workplace might be to workers. Learn more...

OSHA Signage Requirements

The requirements for accident prevention signs vary based on a range of factors, including, but not limited to, the type of hazard being described and necessary minimum viewing distances. Learn more...

SafetySign.com does not recommend or specify the use of a specific safety sign because it does not have knowledge of the hazard(s) our customers are identifying. It is the customer’s sole responsibility to identify the hazard(s) that may be present and select one or more signs (stock or custom) that accurately identify their specific hazard(s) and complies with any applicable federal, state or local laws or regulations, any worksite specific rules or regulations and/or any applicable safety standards (including, without limitation, ANSI and/or OSHA standards). SafetySign.com disclaims any and all liability (excluding liability for our Product Warranty contained in our Terms and Conditions) for any sign selected by a customer and shall not be responsible for any personal injury or property damage resulting from the use of signs purchased from it or for the independent interpretation made of any applicable federal, state or local laws or regulations, any worksite specific rules or regulations, and/or any applicable safety standards (including, without limitation, ANSI and/or OSHA standards). Customer shall indemnify and hold SafetySign.com and its corporate parent and its officers, directors and affiliates harmless from and against any and all claims, loss or expense (including attorneys’ fees) arising from or related to the purchase and use by customer or any third party of any sign purchased by customer from SafetySign.com.

Verified Secure | Customer Approved

Call Us 800-274-6271